New look, same aim for Leaven for the Loaf

Standing up for Religious Freedom rally, Concord, March 2012
Standing up for Religious Freedom rally, Concord, March 2012

When I set out in 2012 to write a pro-life blog, I had a handful of readers, and I think they were all my relatives. Leaven for the Loaf has grown a bit since then. New Hampshire is my home, and I’ve been able to report on New Hampshire bills and candidates and pro-life projects. I’ve shared my observations about potential First-in-the-Nation primary candidates. I’ve marched for life in Concord and Washington. I’m grateful to the readers who have come on board.

Leaven for the Loaf started small, and now it has outgrown its kitchen-table roots. I’m happy to announce that I’ve partnered with the team at Altos Marketing, who will handle web hosting and the technical side of things so that I can concentrate on writing. The site’s new design is as clear and easy to read on your smartphone as it is on a laptop. More content, less clutter.

March for Life in Washington, January 2013
March for Life in Washington, January 2013

Let’s take this new format and plunge right into 2014. There are bills in Concord to watch, and a few in Washington that bear consideration as well. Then there’s an election on the horizon. Who’s talking about the social issues and who isn’t? What’s a pro-life voter to do? Also, pro-lifers will be marching for life in Concord, and praying during 40 Days for Life.

You get the idea. There’s plenty of news ahead.

The first post on Leaven for the Loaf was called Still Talking About ThisWhat I wrote then still holds up as my answer to the question: why bother?

“Still talking about what? About abortion, how it became legal, and how it has grown into a lucrative business for abortion  providers; about women facing challenging pregnancies and sometimes facing the aftermath of terminating those pregnancies; about paying for it and subsidizing the industry.  We’re still talking because there is no way to shut down a debate when lives are at stake.

…What I see being set back are the rights of women and men who choose not to pay even indirectly for the operation of an abortion facility.  I see people lobbying to keep abortion undocumented, so that public health officials will continue to be in the dark about how many New Hampshire women make this “choice” every year. I hear testimony to the need for eugenic abortion, which is a throwback to one of the 20th century’s worst ideas. I hear women who should know better equate a 24-hour waiting period with an outright ban on abortion.

Both in New Hampshire and elsewhere, we need to meet this with more than hand-wringing and the occasional letter to the editor. I offer this blog as a tool and a guide to action for all who share my determination to bring an end to the carnage wrought byRoe.

So yes, we’re still talking about this. Pro-lifers cannot be effective if they stay huddled together. I propose that we step out in faith and leaven the loaf of public discourse. Let’s begin.”

Sign on the National Mall at 2013 March for Life
Sign on the National Mall at 2013 March for Life