The decidedly un-squelched Rep. Groen reflects on Roe

Rep. Warren Groen (photo from warrengroen.blogspot.com)
Rep. Warren Groen (photo from warrengroen.blogspot.com)

On January 22, at the end of the day’s business, Rep. Warren Groen of Rochester stood up in the New Hampshire House of Representatives to address his colleagues under “unanimous consent.” This is a time when legislators traditionally offer eulogies, statements of special recognition, and other remarks not directly related to pending legislation. Such speeches can only be made with the consent of all the members present, which is usually automatic. Knowing that Groen is pro-life and that the 22nd was the anniversary of Roe v. Wade, abortion advocate Rep. Candace Bouchard of Concord stood up to object to Groen’s speech before he started it, thus silencing him and flouting a tradition of House courtesy. Rep. Groen asked once again at the January 29 House session for unanimous consent. He got it. I listened to the livestream of the session as he spoke. He later told me that a number of colleagues chose to leave the room rather than listen to him. Here’s what they missed. I thank Rep. Groen for sending me this text of his prepared remarks.

Madam Speaker, I rise today to share some of the words of Thomas Jefferson, found on the walls of the memorial that bears his name in our nation’s capital.

First, from the Declaration of Independence. “We hold these truths to be self-evident: that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable rights, among these are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness; that to secure these rights governments are instituted among men.”

Was Jefferson a hypocrite, saying this while owning slaves? That case could be made. But we must also recognize that Jefferson wanted to ban slavery in this newly founded country. However, he and the other founding fathers knew that was a deal breaker and would divide and destroy even the attempt at founding this new nation. Therefore they elected to move forward and deal with slavery later. And deal with it we did, with much blood shed.

What was Jefferson’s response to this delay?

“God who gave us life gave us liberty. Can the liberties of a nation be secure when we have removed a conviction that these liberties are the gift of God? Indeed I tremble for my country when I reflect that God is just, that his justice cannot sleep forever. Commerce between master and slave is despotism.”

Proverbs 26:11: “As a dog returns to its vomit, so a fool returns to his folly.” We, having learned that the concept of one person owning another was reprehensible, have returned to our folly. This time it is babies being owned – for destruction.

Today we thank the more than 700 citizens of New Hampshire who braved the cold and snow to mourn the loss of 55 million little unborn citizens, who since January 22, 1973 have been denied their right to “life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.”

Like Jefferson I tremble for my country when I contemplate that God is a Just God, and because I know that God is a God of Mercy I pray for my country that He will forgive this nation for what we have done. Our justice system is among the best in the world, yet when it comes to the unborn it is poverty-stricken.

Hear the words of Mother Teresa: “Any country that accepts abortion is the poorest of the poor.”

Susan B. Anthony, who knew a thing or two about the suffering of women, said this: “Sweeter even than to have had the joy of children of my own has it been for me to help bring about a better state of things for mothers generally, so that their little ones could not be willed away from them.”

And yet we will them away at the blade of a scalpel at the hand of a doctor sworn to do no harm.

As Mother Teresa said, “It is a poverty to decide that a child must die so that you may live as you wish.”

God have Mercy on our nation, Madam Speaker.