Thinning the First in the Nation herd: Santorum, Paul step aside

The New Hampshire first-in-the-nation primary is less than a week away, and in the past few hours, two presidential candidates have dropped out of the race on the GOP side. Both have supported pro-life measures in the past.

Rick Santorum
Rick Santorum (E. Kolb photo)
Rick Santorum (E. Kolb photo)

I backed Rick Santorum’s presidential campaign early in the 2012 cycle, and stuck with him until he bowed out.  No regrets there.

Never forget that in 2003, when he was a U.S. Senator from Pennsylvania, he introduced the federal ban on partial-birth abortion. He saw it through to President Bush’s signature the same year, and the law was upheld by the U.S. Supreme Court in 2007. He also played an important role in constructive welfare reform legislation in the 1990s.

He has worked consistently to help the nation move past Roe v. Wade. I don’t expect that to change.

I still love his blunt question at CPAC in 2014. “Blunt” is the only way he knows how to be when an election is at stake.

Rand Paul

Whenever I’ve heard Rand Paul, whether it’s been at the March for Life in Washington or in the WMUR studio in Manchester, I’ve been favorably impressed. Anyone who calls the Hobby Lobby decision a “net win” for liberty is on the right track.

His speech at the 2013 March for Life was two minutes of inspiration. I’m sorry he’s out of the presidential race, but listening to this again confirms how valuable he is in the Senate.

(By the way, I haven’t spoken publicly about who I’ll vote for in the primary, although that could change at any moment. I will note any such endorsement on this blog.)

2 thoughts on “Thinning the First in the Nation herd: Santorum, Paul step aside

  1. I like Rand but he is a trapped in the contraceptive/birth control mentality…he said he knows of no Republican Senator or Representative who does not approve of funding artificial contraceptives.

    With that kind of mentality Roe v. Wade will stand forever.

    1. A sobering point. I wonder how much the reps’ approval for subsidized contraception comes from constituents’ demand for it, and how much comes from fear of the political clout wielded by the contraceptive manufacturers and distributors.

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