Hyde Amendment turns 40; will it get to 41?

The Hyde Amendment, a restriction on taxpayer funding of Medicaid abortions, turns 40 later this week. If you haven’t already discovered the #HelloHyde web site, please check it out. On the home page, you’ll meet some of the Medicaid kids who may owe their lives to the amendment.

Something else you’ll see on the site are the goals of the #HelloHyde coalition: celebrate the lives saved by the Hyde Amendment, and strengthen the amendment so it protects children conceived in violence. (Currently, Medicaid will fund abortions of children conceived through rape or incest.)

The Hyde Amendment is under attack. It has always had its detractors, who now sense a vulnerable moment in this election year. This is just one more thing at stake in November: the politically-connected abortion industry wants more of your money. The people who win seats in Congress will determine whether the industry will get it.

I wrote this today at DaTechGuy Blog, about the anniversary of the Hyde Amendment and what the presidential candidates are saying.

Abortion providers have tried to torpedo the Hyde Amendment since the day it was proposed. Presidential candidate Hillary Clinton is a determined foe of Hyde.Slate quotes her as saying that it “mak[es] it harder for low-income women to exercise their full rights.” Clinton and candidates in step with her are prepared to coerce all taxpayers into subsidizing abortion.

Donald Trump is reportedly willing to support the Hyde Amendment, according to Marjorie Dannenfelser, chairwoman of Trump’s pro-life coalition.

[Quoting hellohyde.org] The Hyde Amendment’s life-saving impact is hard to overstate. Both supporters and opponents agree that the Hyde Amendment has prevented over a million abortions. The disagreement, sad to say, is over whether that’s a good thing.

Read the rest of the post. 

hellohyde
Graphic by HelloHyde.org