Weekend Reading: when a 14-year-old fears losing abortion access

You may have seen this post from TheFederalist.com already, since it has (quite rightly) been shared far and wide since it went up on December 14. Read and ponder If George Stephanopoulos’s Daughter Wants An Abortion, Can I Have Her Baby?

You may think that an odd title. Joy Pullman, author of the post, explains it.

On “The View” Tuesday, George Stephanopoulos’ wife Ali Wentworth claimed the couple’s 14-year-old daughter reacted to Donald Trump’s win by “screaming ‘no abortions’ really loudly”….Wentworth said both their daughters were terrified by Hillary Clinton’s loss.

Pullman continues:

Well, I can’t get inside this child’s head or this family’s atmosphere. But it sure sounds like someone has been frightening this young lady, and that someone is not Donald Trump. Somewhere this child got the ideas that a) women should vote according to whatever politician most supports their power to evacuate their uteruses at will, and b) Trump can ban abortion.

Pullman could have taken several directions after this. She chooses to write a message to the frightened 14-year-old, who according to her mother “hasn’t kissed a boy yet” and is thus dealing with abortion only on a what-if level.

With the help of the many people everywhere in this country and world who are waiting to surround and support you, you can go through pregnancy and birth and raise your child. If you are really young or in really terrible circumstances, that might be exceedingly difficult. So you have another option to give your child a happy life with a mother and father who will read him or her picture books, take your child on walks, hold your child’s hand during an emergency room visit, and wake up a dozen times a night when that sweet baby has a fever.

It’s called adoption. Thirty-six vetted, loving, wonderful families are on waitlists to adopt every single available baby in this country.

Don’t settle for the excerpts I’ve provided here. The full post is worth your time.  Joy Pullman could have spent 500 words on a political approach or on criticizing the young woman’s parents – and how many of us would have been unable to resist doing that, if the post had been ours to write? Instead, she deals with politics and parenting as briefly as possible before turning her attention to the fearful 14-year-old.

Maybe the information and encouragement Joy Pullman offers the young woman can reach her parents as well.