N.H. House Kills Buffer Zone Repeal Bill

The New Hampshire House has voted “inexpedient to legislate” on a bill to repeal the state’s buffer zone law. The ITL motion passed on a vote of 228-141.

Roll call is here. Note that the motion was “inexpedient to legislate,” so a Yea vote was a vote to kill the repeal bill. A Yea vote was a vote in favor of keeping the buffer zone law.

Representatives Jeanine Notter (R-Merrimack), Max Abramson (R-Seabrook), Walter Stapleton (R-Claremont), and Kurt Wuelper (R-Strafford) spoke in favor of repeal. Rep. Abramson warned his colleagues about the constitutional defects of the law in light of the McCullen decision. Rep. Notter echoed that concern, saying, “The day the buffer zone is actually posted, I guarantee that litigation will ensue, costing us millions.”

Reps. Debra Altschiller (D-Stratham) and Sandra Keans (D-Rochester) defended the buffer zone law. Rep. Altschiller called it a “thoughtfully passed” measure to “remedy the harassment.” She then said that 8 murders, 17 attempted murders, and 42 bombings presumably related to abortion had occurred since Roe v. Wade. She did not mention that these numbers did not refer to New Hampshire.

 

Author: Ellen Kolb

New Hampshire-based writer, pro-life activist, hiker.

2 thoughts on “N.H. House Kills Buffer Zone Repeal Bill”

  1. Whew!!! I am not a lawyer…..not even close and wonder why decisions can’t be clearer.

    There was a buffer zone rule/law. And it was repealed? or not repealed? Maggie is expected to vote which way?

    Sorry I am so dumb, but doubt I am alone.

    Donna

    1. I agree. The process can be confusing. To boil it down:

      NH has a buffer zone law.

      There was a bill to repeal it, HB 124, which the House voted on January 31, 2019.

      The repeal effort failed, when the House voted on a motion of Inexpedient to Legislate.

      The Governor will not see this bill at all. It would have had to pass House and Senate before that could happen.

      So the buffer zone law remains in place. There have now been four unsuccessful attempts to repeal the law.

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