“A Heartfelt Open Letter to CNN’s Alysin Camerota”

I am very happy to send you off to someone else’s blog at the moment, because Verity Swayne has hit a home run over on Verily His. She is responding to a CNN reporter’s question about eugenic abortion, directed to a politician: “…why would you want a family to have to have a child with a severe disability?”

As someone who spends way too much time listening to politicians and lobbyists who are just fine with eugenic abortion (and who have turned “tragicfetalanomalies” into one word), I am cheering as I read Ms. Swayne’s open letter.

…I was immediately reminded of my own anger, fear, and ignorance when my husband and I learned we were going to have a child with Down syndrome. I had so much to learn.  Or should I say that God had so much to teach me. And I know, Alisyn, you just don’t understand, as I didn’t. So, if you’ll stay with me to the end of this heartfelt letter, I’d love to share a simple testimony to the truth of the matter.  I want to tell you about our Belinda, because it’s a beautiful picture of a life worthy of life.

Verity Swayne, from Verily His

Please head over to Verily His and check out her full post. To Nancy Elliott, who brought the post to my attention, double thumbs up.

Update: “The Walls are Talking”

I reviewed the groundbreaking book “The Walls are Talking” when it was published in 2016. It was the first book to gather accounts from former abortion workers who had left the industry and were ready to share their experiences. I commented at the time that the only weak spot in the book was the anonymity chosen by some of the workers.

Since then, more abortion workers have left the industry with the assistance of the peer support group And Then There Were None (ATTWN). More are willing to go public, revealing their faces and names, despite fear of reprisal. On May 21, four of them and ATTWN founder Abby Johnson will be featured in a webinar.

At this writing, registrations are still being accepted at this link for the online event: https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_0vav34L6Ti-C0aHhuBWtNQ

From the email announcement of the event, sent by Abby Johnson and ATTWN:

After Unplanned: The Walls are Talking
(Abby Johnson talks with former abortion workers)
Date: TUESDAY, MAY 21, 2019
Time: 4:30PM PT/ 6:30PM CT/ 7:30PM ET

UNPLANNED, the surprise hit film based on the book I wrote (of the same name, after I quit my job at Planned Parenthood) shook the nation as people were confronted with the truth about abortion. Many people, even those who are pro-life, didn’t know how horrific abortion was or the devastating effects it has wreaked on children, women, and their families. I received hundreds of personal messages about how UNPLANNED changed their views on abortion – and how they viewed those who worked in the industry, just like I did.

UNPLANNED only showed a small portion of what it looks like to work in the abortion industry. But it also showed how love and compassion can help workers quit their jobs and leave the industry entirely. Many of their stories are told in my second book, The Walls Are Talking.

Join me on TUESDAY, MAY 21 at 7:30pm EDT and four former abortion workers to learn:

how their stories are changing the face of the pro-life movement,
– the secrets of the abortion industry, and
– how abortion clinics are dealing with the exodus of so many workers.   I will introduce you to these four courageous former workers:

– Sue Thayer – Sue was a Center Manager for Planned Parenthood for 18 years. After she became pro-life, Sue led the first-ever 40 Days for Life campaign outside the very clinic she managed.

– Monica Cline – Monica was trained by Planned Parenthood for outreach to teens and saw first-hand that the goals were more abortion-centered than they were education-based.

– Adrienne Moton – Adrienne is a former employee of Women’s Medical Center, the infamous Kermit Gosnell’s practice. She worked in the abortion industry for 3 years.

– Myra Neyer – Myra worked for Planned Parenthood in Baltimore. She witnessed an unforgettable abortion procedure that led to her quitting her job in the industry. 

Participants will be entered into a random drawing to receive an autographed copy of my book, The Walls are Talking. It can also be ordered by CLICKING HERE.  I hope you will join me on May 21. These walls are talking, and it’s time we all listen.  Sincerely, Abby Johnson.

Link of Note: Jennifer Christie

New Hampshire readers may recall Jennifer Christie, keynote speaker at the state March for Life last month. She survived a savage sexual assault, and she and her husband are raising & loving her child who was conceived from that assault. Great love, great courage. I include Jennifer as one of the Voices to Trust I’ve featured on this blog; you can search by that category name to find others.

(Why “Voices to Trust”? Because I’ve heard “Trust Women!” too often from abortion advocates. Try trusting these women.)

I’ve just discovered a link about Jennifer on a blog called Stories of Women. Along with her story as related at Save the 1, I find it inspiring and challenging at the same time. I hope you’ll take time to read and share those two posts.

Norma McCorvey and Sandra Cano

Last in the Voices to Trust series. 

Norma McCorvey and Sandra Cano rejected the Supreme Court decisions that were supposedly made in their favor. Their identities obscured in the 1973 Roe v. Wade and Doe v. Bolton cases, they ultimately went public with their dissent from those decisions, reclaiming their own names and proclaiming their support of the right to life.

 

McCorvey was “Jane Roe,” the plaintiff in a challenge to Texas abortion law that culminated in Roe v. Wade, overturning most abortion restrictions and regulations nationwide. Cano was the anonymous plaintiff in Doe v. Bolton, an abortion case decided the same day as Roe, which resulted in an expansive definition of “health of the mother” as justification for abortion on demand. Ironically, neither woman had an abortion pursuant to the decisions.

McCorvey supported the Roe decision for about twenty years before renouncing it and becoming pro-life. In a one-minute 2010 video, she summarized her position. “I realized that my case, which legalized abortion on demand, was the biggest mistake of my life….but now I’m dedicated to spreading the truth about preserving the dignity of all human life from natural conception to natural death.”

Asked in a 1997 interview what she thought people could do to stop abortion, McCorvey said,  “[I]t doesn’t make any difference what religion you are, or how young you are or how old you are, I think if they get up and go to these abortion mills, and stand there – and they don’t have to do anything, they can just stand there and pray, I think that would make a lot of difference. We have to be seen in numbers.”

Sandra Cano (Photo from wonderfullymadeministry.com)
Sandra Cano (Photo from wonderfullymadeministry.com)

Sandra Cano came to be the Supreme Court’s “Doe” after she went to an attorney for help with matters relating to divorce and child custody. As she told a Congressional committee in 2005,

“I was very vulnerable: poor and pregnant with my fourth child, but abortion never crossed my mind. Although it apparently was utmost in the mind of the attorney from whom I sought help….Please understand even though I have lived what many would consider an unstable life and overcome many devastating circumstances, at no time did I ever have an abortion. l did not seek an abortion nor do I believe in abortion. Yet my name and life is now forever linked with the slaughter of 40-50 million babies.
 
“…I feel like my name, life, and identity have been stolen and put on this case without my knowledge and against my wishes….One of the Justices of the Supreme Court said during oral argument in my case ‘What does it matter if she is real or not.’ Well, I am real and it does matter.”

Cano died in 2014, with Doe v. Bolton still standing. To the end of her life, she told her story far and wide. She knew that the truth and her experience were too important to hide.

McCorvey has noted how as with Doe, disregard for truth played an important part in the Roe decision. “I was persuaded by feminist attorneys to lie; to say that I was raped, and needed an abortion. It was all a lie. Since then, over 50 million babies have been murdered. I will take this burden to my grave. Please, don’t follow in my mistakes.”

~~~

Share the words of these women who moved beyond abortion to embrace respect for life: McCorvey and Cano, who lost their identities in court and then reclaimed them; the women who ran abortion facilities and now help people leave the industry; women who survived efforts to abort them; women who reject being called “exceptions“; post-abortive women like Catherine, Karen, Susan and Julia. If ever the words “trust women” are used in an effort to squelch pro-lifers – not mention when they’re used to imply that men have no right to speak up about human rights – bring these women’s words into the discussion.