Reblogged from Kansans for Life: Abortion Group Denounces Sports Team For Pro-Life Ads

(Note: This post is from the Kansans for Life blog, reporting on a Major League Baseball team under fire from abortion advocates for accepting advertising from the Vitae Foundation, a pro-life advocacy group. -EK)

Under the heading, “Kansas City Royals, stop lying about abortion,” an online petition group, Ultraviolet, is currently urging its followers to contact the baseball team to “cut ties with the Vitae Foundation” for “promoting extreme anti-choice propaganda” to women and children. This pro-abortion campaign comes on the heels of a successful campaign to censor pro-life […]

via Abortion groups fight KC Royals

Postscript to House vote on SB 66: the Naysayers

Steve MacDonald over at Granite Grok was blunter than I after the SB 66 vote in the House: “NH Democrats Defend the Right to End a Woman’s Pregnancy Against Her Will.” That’s harsh, but tough to refute, especially in view of all of the day’s roll calls on the bill – not just the main one.

As promised in my report on the SB 66 vote in the New Hampshire House, here’s the list of state representatives who made it clear that they want no part of anyone’s fetal homicide bill.  Two Republicans and one Libertarian are on the list along with 141 Democrats.

One can argue that there was no single “clean” vote among any of the six roll calls on the bill. Using all six, though, it’s fair to assess opposition to the concept of fetal homicide in general and SB 66 in particular. Each of these reps:

The representatives are listed below by county. All are Democrats except for Libertarian Joseph Stallcop and Republicans Carolyn Gargasz and Neal Kurk.

Belknap County

David Huot.

Carroll County

Thomas Buco, Edward Butler, Jerry Knirk.

Cheshire County

Michael Abbott, Richard Ames, Paul Berch, John Bordenet, Daniel Eaton, Barry Faulkner, Donovan Fenton, Cathryn Harvey, Douglas Ley, John Mann, David Meader, Henry Parkhurst, William Pearson, Marjorie Shepardson, Joseph Stallcop, Bruce Tatro, Lucy Weber.

Coos County

Larry Laflamme, Wayne Moynihan, Yvonne Thomas, Edith Tucker.

Grafton County

Susan Almy, Polly Campion, Roger Dontonville, Patricia Higgins, Timothy Josephson, Kevin Maes, Mary Jane Mulligan, Sharon Nordgren, Steven Rand, Suzanne Smith, George Sykes, Andrew White.

Hillsborough County

Jessica Ayala, Robert Backus, Jane Beaulieu, Amanda Bouldin, Shannon Chandley, Skip Cleaver, Patricia Cornell, David Cote, Daniel Sullivan, Linda DiSilvestro, Joel Elber, Armand Forest, Mary Freitas, Carolyn Gargasz, Ken Gidge, Jeff Goley, Suzanne Harvey, Mary Heath, Christopher Herbert, Janice Schmidt, Marty Jack, Amelia Keane, Mark King, Patricia Klee, Neal Kurk, Peter Leishman, David Lisle, Mark MacKenzie, Latha Mangipudi, Jonathan Manley, Joelle Martin, Richard McNamara, Michael O’Brien, Richard O’Leary, Patrick Long, Marjorie Porter, Carol Roberts, Cindy Rosenwald, Kendall Snow, Catherine Sofikitis, Timothy Smith, Robert Walsh, Connie Van Houten, Kermit Williams.

Merrimack County

Caroletta Alicea, Christy Bartlett, Clyde Carson, David Doherty, Karen Ebel, Mary Gile, Howard Moffett, Paul Henle, James MacKay, Linda Kenison, David Luneau, Mel Myler, Chip Rice, Beth Rodd, Katherine Rogers, Dianne Schuett, Steve Shurtleff,  Alan Turcotte, Mary Beth Walz, David Woolpert.

Rockingham County

Debra Altschiller, Skip Berrien, Michael Cahill, Jacqueline Cali-Pitts, Renny Cushing, Charlotte DiLorenzo, Michael Edgar, Paula Francese, Tamara Le, Dennis Malloy, Rebecca McBeath, Mindi Messmer, Kate Murray, Pamela Gordon, Ellen Read, Peter Somssich, Gerald Ward.

Strafford County

Peter Bixby, Wayne Burton, Jacalyn Cilley, Donna Ellis, Isaac Epstein, Sherry Frost, Chuck Grassie, Timothy Horrigan, Sandra Keans, Hamilton Krans, Marjorie Smith, Lin Opderbecke, Peter Schmidt, Jeff Salloway, Catt Sandler, Judith Spang, Dale Sprague, Kenneth Vincent, Janet Wall.

Sullivan County

John Cloutier, Raymond Gagnon, Suzanne Gottling, Virginia Irwin, Lee Oxenham, Andrew Schmidt, Linda Tanner.


State Budget: how much for abortion providers?

(Update, 5/27/17: The latest Center for Medical Progress video has been taken down by YouTube, and so it is unavailable where I had originally linked to it below. Instead, you can view CMP’s previous videos at this link. Watch them before the next budget vote.)

The New Hampshire Senate will vote next week on the budget proposal prepared by the Senate Finance Committee. Whatever the Senate passes will go to the House the next day.

Under the Senate proposal, would any of the money allocated to the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) go to abortion providers? Would abortion providers still be in line for family planning contracts?

Maybe. The proposed Senate budget language says no state funds can go to abortion providers for abortion services.  I have seen the draft of an amendment that would prevent state funds from going to abortion providers, period.

Stay tuned. In the meantime, the Center for Medical Progress has released another video of Planned Parenthood’s abortion providers discussing their work. No bloody-baby pictures here; just words. It’s a safe bet that the affiliates mentioned in the video operate with the help of taxpayers.

I can’t link directly to YouTube for the video, since YouTube took it down – but not before some viewers found a way to share it. A Leaven reader was kind enough to point me to the Facebook account Another Boy (@babiesbetrayed), where the video is available. I hope the link is still live as you read this.

 

A Team Effort: St. Gianna’s Place

“A Safe Harbor for Mother and Child.” Step by step, St. Gianna’s Place is on the way to becoming a shelter for pregnant and parenting women. Administrative details are in place: a board of directors; nonprofit tax status. Now comes the work of acquiring a house, most likely in Londonderry, New Hampshire.

St. Gianna’s is taking shape one step at a time, guided by board members and an increasing number of supporters. One of those supporters, Lynn, hosted me and several other women for coffee recently so we could meet Maria Szemplinski of the St. Gianna’s Place board.

Maria talked about the planned home and about the people whose vision has brought the project this far.  She told us about the need for more shelter beds in our area: “our Calcutta is right here,” she said, evoking Mother Teresa. She talked about other shelters in the region and how their staffs have been generous in sharing their advice and experience with the St. Gianna’s team.

So what’s next? We asked Maria what we could do.

One obvious answer: fundraising. That wasn’t what Maria led with, though. She asked us to consider what our gifts might be.

I knew some of my fellow guests slightly, and had met others for the first time that morning: a student active in pro-life work at her school, people with experience working with at-risk youth, an adoptive parent. These were women with full lives, hardly in need of another project, but all of them eager to offer practical assistance to pregnant and parenting women. I was in a room full of potential mentors and teachers.

Our hostess was meeting one of St. Gianna’s most urgent needs by welcoming us for an information session. Spreading the word is critical to attracting the material support the project needs. Maria and her fellow board members welcome opportunities to speak with any person or group who’d like to learn more.

Maria made it clear that even at this stage, the St. Gianna’s board is on the lookout for people with the skills to work with women who want educational guidance, job training, and parenting skills.

Eventually, it will be time to furnish and equip the house that will serve as the shelter. There will be ongoing needs for food, baby supplies, and building maintenance.

There will be – there is – work for everyone who wants to make the shelter happen and help it thrive.

Learn more about St. Gianna’s Place, about the woman whose life and example inspired the project, and how to contact the St. Gianna’s Place team for more information. Watch the St. Gianna’s Place Facebook page for updates. 


 

House committee to take up retained bills 5/23, including fetal homicide

The New Hampshire House Criminal Justice and Public Safety Committee has scheduled a work session for Tuesday, May 23 on several retained bills, including two on fetal homicide (HB 156 and SB 66).

Also on the agenda is HB 287, which was introduced as a bill to study decriminalization of prostitution. All three of these bills were retained by the committee earlier this session, preventing them from coming before the full House.

A work session has no predetermined outcome. It is possible that the committee may vote to reconsider an earlier decision to retain a bill.

Watch the blog’s Facebook page for updates on May 23.


Update: Those “Common Sense” Initiatives Sununu Supported

Governor Chris Sununu (nh.gov photo)

Six months ago, just before the last statewide election in New Hampshire, a concerned pro-life Republican elicited a letter from Chris Sununu listing some pro-life initiatives Sununu would back if he were elected governor.

Number of those initiatives that Governor Sununu has had a chance to sign: zero.

Fetal Homicide Bill: House and Senate versions have been “retained” in the House Criminal Justice Committee. No word yet on any subcommittee being assigned to look at these bills.

Women’s Health Protection Act: However that may be defined – whether informed consent, or making abortion facilities meet the same standards as ambulatory care facilities, or letting a woman know in advance the name and qualifications of the person about to perform her abortion – no such legislation came forward in the 2017 New Hampshire legislative session.

Healthcare Freedom of Conscience Act: No legislation offered.

Late-Term Abortion Ban: Failed. A motion of “ought to pass with amendment” on HB 578 failed in the House on a 170-189 vote. The bill was then tabled on a voice vote.  A few representatives indicated that they voted ITL because the bill didn’t go far enough. That was not the prevailing view.

Buffer Zone Repeal: Failed. HB 579 was voted “inexpedient to legislate” on a 191-165 House vote, the First Amendment notwithstanding. Note, however, that no abortion facility has yet posted a zone. No thanks to the legislature for that.

From candidate-now-Governor Sununu’s letter: “I know that my winning the race for Governor will be our best chance to get this important work done.”

By the way, there are Republican majorities in the New Hampshire House and Senate this year. Do not confuse “Republican” with “pro-life.”

The Governor’s term still has a year and a half to run. He may get something relevant on his desk next year from House and Senate.  It remains to be seen if he’ll sit back and wait, or if he’ll work to build support for the measures he said he’d sign.


 

a Granite State pro-life blog by Ellen Kolb