Area screening of “Hush” attracts viewers – and deniers

Last night’s screening of the documentary Hush at the Nashua (N.H.) Public Library attracted a modest audience. It also attracted online criticism and denial of its documented claims.

I don’t know how many of the deniers actually saw the film.

This was the second time I watched it, and if anything it increased my respect for the director who refuses to shut up about her findings and experience, even in the face of disbelief or outright condescension. Something on my Twitter feed this morning serves as a brief illustration: “Unfortunate this film gets any play. It ignores available scientific evidence & distorts issue.” (At least that tweet was polite.)

The lengthy list of references at the end of the film was displayed very quickly, and only a screenshot would allow close scrutiny. There’s an abbreviated list at hushfilm.com, as long as “available evidence” is at issue.

Director Punam Kumar Gill is steadfastly pro-choice but refuses to turn away from research pointing to conclusions that most abortion advocates don’t want to hear: links between abortion and breast cancer, between abortion and subsequent preterm births, and between abortion and adverse physical and psychological outcomes for women. She’s still pro-choice. She is also, as one of her interviewees put it, pro-information.

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I’ve already written about the documentary elsewhere, albeit briefly. A few thoughts about last night’s screening:

I recognized four elected officials in the audience, all of whom remained afterward for conversation. New Hampshire’s lack of an informed consent law for abortion and failure to collect abortion statistics were topics of interest.

The film ended twenty minutes before the library closed for the evening. A library employee assured us we were welcome to stay for discussion as long as the building stayed open. I can attest that discussions continued outside on the library plaza after closing time.

No facilitator was needed. As soon as the lights came up, about four groups formed spontaneously. One woman who was there said this morning that her group’s discussion led to her, a pro-lifer, having a conversation (not an argument) with a pro-choice viewer of the film, lasting several hours off-site. The film’s director and producers would probably be pleased at that.

By far, most of the people who attended were women. I overheard several of them talking about bad experiences with condescending doctors. They don’t trust health care providers to be candid with them about abortion or anything else. It was only a generation or two ago that such medical condescension was recognized as misogyny, treating women as less-intelligent creatures who really oughta leave their health (and that of their children) to the professionals.

There was a collective gasp from the people seated near me during the film as the director was shown being escorted off the premises of a cancer research agency. All she, a pro-choice woman, had wanted to do was ask questions regarding information the agency promulgated online and in print dismissing any link between abortion and breast cancer.

The library hosted the screening after a city resident asked for it and kept following up until she heard “yes.” Maybe that gives you ideas.

Weekend reading – and a movie screening to add to your calendar

September 22 (that’s next Thursday) at the Nashua Public Library, 7 p.m., there will be a free screening of the documentary Hush. I saw it a few months ago courtesy of Massachusetts Citizens for Life, and it deserves much wider circulation. Attend if you can, and bring a friend or two.

From the film’s promotional web site:

“In ‘Pro-Life’ circles, hearing about the negative effects of abortion is a common thing. Churches and Crisis Pregnancy Centres will tell you about the psychological trauma, potential for physical damage, and even breast cancer, that abortion may cause.

“On the other hand, in ‘Pro-Choice’ circles, and at abortion  clinics it is commonly told that the procedure is much safer than childbirth, that the psychological effects are the same as if you deliver the child, and the breast cancer connection is a closed case.

“One way or another, someone is lying to women.”

Catholic Bishops respond to “Catholics for Choice”

An ad campaign launched recently by pro-abortion Catholics drew a quick response from the U.S. Catholic bishops.

“The organization rejects and distorts Catholic social teaching — and actually attacks its foundation. As Pope Francis said this summer to leaders in Poland,. . . ‘Life must always be welcomed and protected…from conception to natural death. All of us are called to respect life and care for it.'”

Read the full statement here.

Bonus video: David Daleiden on Planned Parenthood’s political work

h/t to Lila Rose, who posted this short video to her Twitter feed where I found it.

“Hush” documentary: free screening in Nashua, 9/22

photo7-215x215Thanks to the diligent efforts of a Nashua resident, the groundbreaking documentary “Hush” will be shown free of charge at the Nashua Public Library on September 22 at 7 p.m. I saw this film a few months ago before its official release, and I recommend it to anyone – regardless of position on the right to life – who is concerned about women’s health. There’s no other documentary like this. A pro-choice director and a pro-life producer got together for the project with one common concern: women’s health, and whether abortion has affected it. They present their alarming and enlightening findings in the film, without sensationalism.

This excellent documentary is worth seeing. It’s less than two hours long, so the screening won’t run too late. Bring your friends & spread the word. Students, this is for you, too.

I wrote this after seeing the film last April.

Pro-choice documentary filmmaker Punam Kumar Gill and pro-life producer Joses Martin explored that subject, not knowing where it would lead. What they found was clinical evidence of a link between abortion and breast cancer – a link that has been “hushed up.” They also saw how in different parts of the world, preborn girls are usually the ones targeted in sex-selection abortions. Gill and Martin saw the money-making side of the abortion industry and the effects of abortion on a woman’s later pregnancies.

“Hush” is the result. Gill remains pro-choice, but she doesn’t deny or turn away from her infuriating findings. She calls for open, honest dialogue.

Thursday, September 22, 7 p.m. at the Nashua Public Library: your evening will be well-spent.

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“Hush” documentary DVD to be released soon

Hush promoLast April, I wrote about an enlightening and disturbing documentary called “Hush” that was screened at a local conference. The film is a joint effort by a pro-choice filmmaker and a pro-life producer to examine abortion and its effect on women’s health, and to do so without being distracted by political concerns. Their discoveries inspired the title of the film, as they found that some valuable science-based information seems to be “hushed up” and unavailable to abortion-minded women.

Watch the film’s trailer at this link. The DVD comes out on July 1.

The woman who made this film still considers herself pro-choice, but her own findings surprised and unsettled her.  I admire her honesty and her quality filmmaking.

Special screening licenses are available for showing the film to groups. Learn more about that on the film’s web site.

You’ll be seeing reminders about “Hush” on Leaven’s social media feeds, and I hope you’ll share them. The film’s tagline is “Start a healthy conversation.” This documentary is a good way to do just that, no matter what the viewer thinks about abortion.

Four takeaways from Mass. Citizens for Life Convention ’16

The scene was Assumption College in Worcester for Massachusetts Citizens for Life’s 2016 convention on April 2. A packed program for seven hours meant some concurrent sessions. That made for difficult choices, but no bad ones. See photos of the event on the MCFL Facebook page.

A few observations:

A film called “Hush” is going to grab your attention.

The convention featured the screening of a film that you’re going to want to see and share. “Hush”


 

is from two filmmakers with opposing views of abortion who found that they shared  genuine, open curiosity about abortion’s effect on women’s health.

Pro-choice documentary filmmaker Punam Kumar Gill and pro-life producer Joses Martin explored that subject, not knowing where it would lead. What they found was clinical evidence of a link between abortion and breast cancer – a link that has been “hushed up.” They also saw how in different parts of the world, preborn girls are usually the ones targeted in sex-selection abortions. Gill and Martin saw the money-making side of the abortion industry and the effects of abortion on a woman’s later pregnancies.

“Hush” is the result. Gill remains pro-choice, but she doesn’t deny or turn away from her infuriating findings. She calls for open, honest dialogue.

The film’s web site includes a brief trailer and information on the crowdfunding effort that is making distribution possible.

We need to listen to former abortion workers who have turned their backs on the industry – and help them share their stories.

Catherine Adair, well-known to longtime readers of this blog, spoke at the convention about her time as a Planned Parenthood employee and about her pro-life conversion. I looked around the room during her presentation and saw the rapt faces of people who were obviously hearing a former abortion worker for the first time.

(Catherine’s story may be found on her blog The Harvest is Abundant.)

This was a pro-life crowd, and still, what Catherine had to say was new to many of the people in the room. I will never again assume that “everybody” already knows what goes on in the abortion industry.

I looked at Catherine while “Hush” was being screened, and saw her nodding as former abortion workers were interviewed in the documentary. She later affirmed that what she heard in the film was consistent with what she herself saw at PP.

Abby Johnson has written, “I have been told by several former workers that they will never come forward with their stories, because they are so scared of how they will be treated by us – by us, the supposed ‘Christian’ movement.” I thought of that as I listened to Catherine. In a way, in telling her own story, she’s speaking on behalf of those women and men who have left the abortion industry silently. They have yet to tell their own stories – and those stories won’t be easy to hear.

Let’s hear it for oratory contests (and the students who participate).

A high school student named Isabelle was named winner of MCFL’s Dr. Mildred F. Jefferson Oratory Contest, and she chose a topic that’s not on the radar of many students her age: assisted suicide and euthanasia, concentrating on the grim situation in parts of Europe where it’s legal to euthanize children. Let it be known that the rising generation sees what’s going on.

(MCFL is now raising money to send Isabelle and a chaperone to the National Right to Life convention, where she’ll compete with contest winners from other states.)

Isabelle’s presentation reminded me that a New Hampshire pro-life group used to sponsor a student oratory contest, long ago.  There’s an annual pro-life essay contest sponsored by the New Hampshire Knights of Columbus, and as a writer, I applaud that. Still…it sure would be nice to give budding speakers some encouragement, too. What do you think?

Flee the MOLST.

Just when you thought you had the advance-directive landscape all figured out for end-of-life care, along comes a new kind of document. Medical orders for life-sustaining treatment (MOLST) is here – a law authorizing them quietly passed in New Hampshire a couple of years ago – and they’re a problem.

Sandra Kucharski, R.N. began her presentation to the MCFL convention by asking her listeners to make a grocery list. No other guidelines – just a grocery list. After a few minutes, she announced,”You’ve just made a list for food enough to feed a bunch of people at a 4th of July barbecue in 2020.” Whaaaat? When we didn’t know what we were making a list for….aha. So it is with MOLST.

More about MOLST on this blog in a later post. For now, I intend to avoid signing one, while making sure my health care proxy and advance directive (which is NOT a living will, thank you very much) are still in place.

Etc.

I could go on: speakers on Silent No More, youth ministry, RU-486 reversal, sex education in Massachusetts and its link to the abortion industry, the Texas abortion regulations now at the Supreme Court, and effective use of social media left me with almost more information than I could take in at one sitting.  Well done, MCFL.