State senate primaries 2016: Districts 1, 2, 8

Part one of a review of state senate primaries

The 2016 primary election in New Hampshire will be Tuesday, September 13. You can obtain a sample ballot from your town clerk or from the Secretary of State’s web site under “Election Information.”

Of the 24 state senate races, nine have primary contests in one or both parties. I haven’t surveyed or interviewed the candidates, but there are voting records available for those who are incumbents or who have held office before. Here’s a look at state senate primary races, with voting records on some life-issue bills I’ve followed in the 2015-2016 session. If one of your local candidates has no record to go by, it’s time for you to reach out with friendly questions. September 13 is coming up quickly.

Find selected 2016 life-issue votes at this link. 

Find selected 2015 life-issue votes at this link.

I am counting on New Hampshire readers to let me know if there are candidates I have mistakenly listed as not having held state office before. I’ll make corrections as needed.

District 1:  There is a Republican primary between Rep. Leon Rideout and Dolly McPhaul. The incumbent senator, Jeff Woodburn, is unchallenged on the Democratic side. McPhaul has no voting record on the life issues of which I’m aware.

Rideout has been a leader on fetal homicide legislation. (For more about Griffin’s Law and other fetal homicide bills, see this page with links to coverage of hearings.) He has a pro-life voting record. Look for his results at the links above, under Coos County district 7.

District 2:  There is a Republican primary between Rep. Brian Gallagher and former Rep. Bob Giuda. Both have pro-life voting records. Gallagher has a very strong pro-life voting record over the past two years for Belknap County district 4 (see links above).

Giuda served in the House from 2001 to 2006, and during that time he supported parental notification for minors seeking abortion (voting against an “inexpedient to legislate” motion on HB 1380, 2/15/02; and then voting “ought to pass” on HB 763, 3/25/03); he supported a partial-birth abortion ban (voting against an “inexpedient to legislate” motion on HB 1220, 3/17/04); he opposed public funding of abortion (voting against an “inexpedient to legislate” motion on HB 1253, 2/19/04); and he supported effective informed consent for abortion (HB 1340, 3/17/04; HB 399, 3/9/05). In 2001, he voted to abolish New Hampshire’s death penalty (HB 171, 4/5/01; the bill failed by fewer than 10 votes).

District 2 is an open seat, with incumbent Jeanie Forrester now running for Governor.

District 8: There is a Republican primary between Jim Beard and Ruth Ward, neither of whom has a State House voting record. Neither candidate’s web site mentions any stand on the right to life. District 8 is an open seat, as former Senator Jerry Little has been appointed New Hampshire’s Banking Commissioner.


Jim Adams, Exec Council candidate: life is “the most important gift we have”

Jim Adams, candidate for Executive Council district 4
Jim Adams, candidate for Executive Council district 4. Photo by Ellen Kolb.

While at the State House waiting for the recent Executive Council meeting to begin, I met Jim Adams. He’s running in the Republican primary for Executive Council district 4, in hopes of taking the seat away from incumbent Chris Pappas. Our chat didn’t rise to the level of a formal interview, but he said something to me that I thought was worth taking down.

When I was in Vietnam, I was a hospital corpsman, eighteen years old. I dealt with the human wreckage of war. I had no opinions [on] pro-life; that was not as prominent as it is today.

I had a  young Marine who was badly injured. It was easy for me to see he was not going to make it. He grabbed my left arm and held onto it so tight I could barely get started [assisting him]. I was doing everything I could. You have to keep them focused, because if they don’t look in your eyes, they see how bad it is, they go into shock. He’s wanting his mother; all the things people think happen at that time, most of it does. He was hanging on to his life with every fiber in his being. And he slowly started to let go of my hand. He was not going to make it.

At eighteen years old, when I saw how hard that young man was trying to hang on to his life with every fiber in his being, I saw that life is the most important gift we have, and one should never be taken as a matter of convenience.

That’s one way to start a conversation about the life issues. Mr. Adams’s web site, under the heading “Fight for Your Family”, mentions his opposition to using funds to “support abortion.” I encourage district 4 voters to pursue specifics with Mr. Adams and with his GOP primary challenger, Joe Kelly Levasseur.

On the Democratic side, incumbent Pappas is unopposed. Pappas has voted twice in Council for public funding for abortion providers.

(District 4 includes the city of Manchester and the towns of Allenstown, Auburn, Barrington, Bedford, Bow, Candia, Chichester, Deerfield, Epsom, Goffstown, Hooksett, Lee, Londonderry, Loudon, Northwood, Nottingham, Pembroke, and Pittsfield.)


Watch for reports from Pro-Life Women’s Conference in Dallas

I’m stepping away from my usual beat for a trip to Dallas, Texas and the Pro-Life Women’s Conference hosted by And Then There Were None and the Alice Paul Group. I’ll post updates via Facebook, Twitter and Instagram (@leaven4theloaf) while I’m on the scene June 24-26, and I’ll add follow-up posts when I return.

This trip wouldn’t be possible without the support of sponsors of this blog. I’m grateful to my readers for this opportunity.

You can read about the conference at its web site, and you can see from the list of speakers why I’m giving up a weekend to fly halfway across the country. It’s easy to fall into the trap of thinking that what I see here in New Hampshire is all there is to the pro-life movement. As you’ll see from the variety of affiliations among the speakers – Secular Pro-Life, New Wave Feminists, Guiding Star Project, Democrats for Life, BraveLove, to name just a few – there’s much more to the pro-life mission.

Let’s say I’m expanding my comfort zone, not stepping outside it.

I’ll see a few familiar faces in Dallas, including New Hampshire neighbor Darlene Pawlik of Save the 1, who blogs at The Darling Princess.  I’m glad she has this opportunity to tell her story to women from around the country.

I’ll keep you posted.

 

 

Delay in vote means extra evening to lobby the NH House

Gotta love a long agenda. New Hampshire’s $100-a-year citizen legislators have eight more days to deal with all their bills before they take up what’s coming over from the Senate. This week’s life-issue bills got pushed to tomorrow, March 20: abortion-facility licensing, collection of abortion statistics, Griffin’s law, and the truly long-shot (given the makeup of this legislature) personhood bill.

Fun fact: the House today rejected a bill that would have repealed the requirement that New Hampshire restaurants serve sugar only in packets. No open bowls of sugar. Food safety prevails, or some such thing. We’ll see tomorrow how many reps support regulating sugar bowls but not abortion facilities.

While Scott Brown explores a Senate run, let’s explore his record on life issues

Former U.S. Senator Scott Brown – ex-Massachusetts, now a New Hampshire resident – has set up an exploratory committee for a return trip to the the U.S. Senate, with hopes of sending Jeanne Shaheen packing. He has to get past a Republican primary first. What’s a pro-life voter to do?

What’s he saying as he “explores” the New Hampshire seat? Not much.

First of all, don’t try to learn anything from his web site, scottbrown.com. It has next to no information yet. The biography on his Facebook page makes no mention of his life-issues record.

What has he said in the past?

Brown self-identifies as “pro-choice,” according to numerous articles about his earlier Senate campaigns. According to the Boston Globe (9/20/12), when he was challenged by Elizabeth Warren in a campaign debate, he answered, “Listen, we’re both pro-choice. I’m a moderate pro-choice Republican. I always have been.”

He voted in favor of “Romneycare” when he was a Massachusetts state senator, but he was opposed to Obamacare. A key to his 2010 victory when he won the seat previously held by the late Sen. Ted Kennedy was his declaration that he would be “the 41st vote” against Obamacare, preventing Senate Democrats from breaking any potential GOP filibuster on the measure. (Later parliamentary maneuvers led to passage of the law in a manner that prevented a filibuster.)

He co-sponsored the Blunt Amendment, which would have respected the religious liberty rights of employers refusing to pay for contraception and other medical services in employee insurance if the employers had a religious or moral objection. (The measure was not passed.)

He opposed the appointment of Elena Kagan to the U.S. Supreme Court, a decision for which he was attacked by his 2012 Senate opponent, Elizabeth Warren.

From Brown’s campaign press secretary, 2012: “Senator Brown supports the right of women to make this decision [abortion] in consultation with their doctor. He supports strong parental notification laws and opposes partial birth and taxpayer-funded abortions.”

Follow the abortion-advocacy money: Coakley, Warren, Shaheen

Calling himself pro-choice has not helped Brown with abortion advocacy groups. Brown’s U.S. Senate campaigns so far have been textbook examples of defensive elections for prolife voters. Both Martha Coakley (Brown’s opponent in the 2010 Senate race) and Elizabeth Warren (who beat him in 2012) are vociferously pro-abortion, and they received support from EMILY’s List, probably the best-funded group dedicated to electing “pro-choice Democratic women” at all levels.  Shaheen is a longtime EMILY’s List favorite.

The day Brown announced his exploratory committee for Shaheen’s seat, this was on EMILY’s List’s Twitter feed:

In 2010, Massachusetts Citizens for Life supported Brown over Coakley. The Susan B. Anthony List applauded his 2010 election as well, but did not concern itself with his 2012 race. From Politico

“We lauded his victory in the special election because it was part of a defensive campaign to block abortion in the health care bill,” said SBA List President Marjorie Dannenfelser. “The special election was a unique situation where every vote mattered. He is not a pro-life champion and does not claim to be, and there is no chance that we would help him in the coming election.”