Weekend reading, 5/20/16: on Zika, tolerance, and a Canadian problem

Every Friday, I serve up three of my favorite posts from other blogs for you to read over the weekend, after you’ve caught up on Leaven for the Loaf. Have a good weekend!


Wall Street Journal: “Sisters Act Two: Back in the Habit” (wsj.com)

“As HHS works out the technical details of a new accommodation, its political instinct will be to enforce militant cultural liberalism….so why not crush the Little Sisters and their old-fashioned morals now?But better, not least for the temper of U.S. politics, to abide by America’s tradition of religious pluralism. HHS and the White House admit a more tolerant solution is possible.” Read the rest of the post.

Simcha Fisher: “That death may march in the shade” (aleteia.com)

(Editor’s note: I featured this earlier on Leaven’s Facebook page, but this post is worth sharing again.) 

“Sara Mujica of Danbury, CT is seventeen and pregnant. A pretty common story. What is unusual about her, at least in the U.S., is that she has Zika virus. She caught it in Honduras, where she travelled to visit her boyfriend. She started showing symptoms of the disease just after she found out she was pregnant….She says: ‘I have Decided to keep my Baby , Because it’s what God has given to me & I am taking Full Responsibility Of MY Actions &  I do NOT believe in Abortion so I would never do that.’

“The Giant Internet Hand of Spanking sprang into action and declared that Mujica is an opportunist, a liar, a cheat, a fraudster, a hypocrite, and of course a slut and a whore….Most of all, she should get an abortion. She must get an abortion. They could easily forgive her for all her missteps, as long as she makes the only responsible choice now.” Read the full post.

Margaret Dore: Canada has a problem as it tries to codify assisted suicide (alexschadenberg.blogspot.ca)

(Editor’s note: After a pro-assisted-suicide decision by Canada’s Supreme Court, the nation’s lawmakers are attempting to make laws to codify the decision. Dore,  an attorney and anti-euthanasia activist, warns that what’s under consideration violates the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms.)

“People who sign up for assisted suicide or euthanasia do not necessarily intend to go through with it. Maybe it was somebody else’s idea, maybe they were ambivalent or maybe they signed up ‘just in case’ things get bad. A patient can also change his or her mind. There are many people, including heirs, who can benefit from a patient’s death. If the patient was tricked, objected or struggled, who would know? [This] bill is a response to the Canadian Supreme Court decision, Carter v. Canada, which envisioned a ‘carefully designed and monitored system of safeguards.’ The bill has no such system.” Read the rest of the post.


Et Cetera: week ending 11/23/14

Yesterday’s East Coast Conference Against Assisted Suicide was a splendid event, and I’ll share more about it in upcoming posts. For this weekend’s collection of short items, though, I recommend you add these people and organizations to your social media feeds for ongoing information. This is not a comprehensive list of resources, but it should keep you busy for now.

Alex Schadenberg (courtesy EPC Facebook page)
Alex Schadenberg (courtesy EPC Facebook page)

The Euthanasia Prevention Coalition, led by executive director Alex Schadenberg, has become an indispensable resource for anyone investigating the status of assisted suicide and euthanasia laws worldwide. Alex is based in Canada, but his work keeps him traveling to the United States and beyond. Follow the EPC blog at alexschadenberg.blogspot.ca, “like” EPC’s Facebook page, and follow @AlexSchadenberg and @EuthanasiaPC on Twitter.

The Family Institute of Connecticut’s involvement in the defeat of Connecticut’s assisted suicide bill this year was notable. Web site: www.ctfamily.org. Twitter: @FICaction.

Maggie Karner, maker of the best YouTube video we’ll see all year, is on Twitter @Karnerms.

Not Dead Yet  (or as the heading for their web site says, Not Dead Yet: The Resistance) is a disability rights group that frankly and rightly sees assisted suicide and euthanasia as tools of discrimination against people with disabilities. Web site: www.notdeadyet.org. John Kelly is NDY’s New England regional director, Boston-based, and his Twitter feed @JohnBrianKelly aggregates a number of news stories and blog posts about discrimination against people with disabilities.

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A few selections from this week’s news feed: Dave Andrusko from National Right to Life on Two women facing terminal brain disease, two profoundly different legacies …Margaret Dore, a Washington State elder law attorney who has traveled to New Hampshire to help fight assisted suicide bills here, takes note of an assisted suicide bill now being considered in New Jersey … New to Twitter, or simply looking for ways to convey your pro-life message on your social media accounts? American Life League has some suggestions …Abby Johnson answers the question she still gets about how she could stay at PP as long as she did.

May your preparations for Thanksgiving go smoothly!