Hyde Amendment turns 40; will it get to 41?

The Hyde Amendment, a restriction on taxpayer funding of Medicaid abortions, turns 40 later this week. If you haven’t already discovered the #HelloHyde web site, please check it out. On the home page, you’ll meet some of the Medicaid kids who may owe their lives to the amendment.

Something else you’ll see on the site are the goals of the #HelloHyde coalition: celebrate the lives saved by the Hyde Amendment, and strengthen the amendment so it protects children conceived in violence. (Currently, Medicaid will fund abortions of children conceived through rape or incest.)

The Hyde Amendment is under attack. It has always had its detractors, who now sense a vulnerable moment in this election year. This is just one more thing at stake in November: the politically-connected abortion industry wants more of your money. The people who win seats in Congress will determine whether the industry will get it.

I wrote this today at DaTechGuy Blog, about the anniversary of the Hyde Amendment and what the presidential candidates are saying.

Abortion providers have tried to torpedo the Hyde Amendment since the day it was proposed. Presidential candidate Hillary Clinton is a determined foe of Hyde.Slate quotes her as saying that it “mak[es] it harder for low-income women to exercise their full rights.” Clinton and candidates in step with her are prepared to coerce all taxpayers into subsidizing abortion.

Donald Trump is reportedly willing to support the Hyde Amendment, according to Marjorie Dannenfelser, chairwoman of Trump’s pro-life coalition.

[Quoting hellohyde.org] The Hyde Amendment’s life-saving impact is hard to overstate. Both supporters and opponents agree that the Hyde Amendment has prevented over a million abortions. The disagreement, sad to say, is over whether that’s a good thing.

Read the rest of the post. 

hellohyde
Graphic by HelloHyde.org

Weekend reading: celebrate Hyde; compare/contrast; victory in New Mexico

This was a tough week to pick only three items from the Best of the Rest pile for your weekend reading. I hope these are three that you haven’t seen yet – enjoy them, and have a happy Independence Day weekend!

Celebrate the 40th anniversary of the Hyde Amendment

This is a link to a web site, not a single blog entry, but this is can’t-miss information. September marks the 40th anniversary of the Hyde Amendment, which sharply limits Medicaid funding of abortions. (There are exceptions for abortions in case of rape, incest, and life of the mother.) Abortion providers want Hyde eliminated. A pro-life coalition led by Secular Pro-Life wants to celebrate it and expand it:

“Celebrate the lives saved by the Hyde Amendment and the lives of all Medicaid kids. Preserve the Hyde Amendment against attacks from the abortion lobby. Expand the Hyde Amendment to cover children in every state and children conceived through violence, and cut the abortion industry off from all sources of taxpayer funding (not just Medicaid).”

Watch Twitter & Instagram for the #HelloHyde hash tag.


Goldberg: No-Gun list? How about a No-Abort list? (nationalreview.com)

Commentator and occasional provocateur Jonah Goldberg has a modest proposal: contrast anti-Second-Amendment rhetoric with pro-abortion rhetoric. Read the full post. (Don’t blame me. I’m just the messenger.)


New Mexico court rules against against assisted suicide

Alex Schadenberg of the Euthanasia Prevention Coalition reports on the unanimous vote by the New Mexico Supreme Court to overturn a lower court decision that “found” a right to assisted suicide in the state.

“The original case was based on a word game. The original case argued that ‘aid in dying’, which is also known as assisted suicide, is not prohibited by the New Mexico assisted suicide law because ‘aid in dying’ is not assisted suicide.” Read the full post. 

By the Numbers 5/29/13

Ten top pro-life things you can do this summer is a list of ideas from LifeSiteNews.com, geared to young people. Click on the link for some inspiration. Some of the suggestions apply to everyone, such as #6, the “diaper drive.”

Four: the number of votes from U.S. Supreme Court justices it would have required for the Court to hear a case involving Indiana’s attempt to block state Medicaid funds from going to abortion providers. Yesterday, the Court refused to hear an appeal of a lower court decision striking down the Indiana law. (The Court only agrees to hear an appeal if a minimum of four Justices vote to do so.) The Los Angeles Times reports on the case here. The Indiana law was challenged by – you guessed it – Planned Parenthood.

All Girls Allowed logoOne organization to discover: All Girls Allowed. The founder, Chai Ling, was moved to action by China’s one-child policy, which combined with a cultural preference for having boys has led to what All Girls Allowed calls “gendercide” (an apt term). The group is based in Boston. Check the web site to learn about their “37 Seconds of Silence” program. Follow on Twitter: @AllGirlsAllowed.