Another defensive election race: Governor

Walt Havenstein (facebook.com photo)
Walt Havenstein (facebook.com photo)

One office, two candidates, both self-identified “pro-choice.” Welcome to New Hampshire’s 2014 election. I’m not thinking about the Senate race, though. This is about Maggie Hassan and Walt Havenstein and who’s going to be the next Governor of the Granite State.

Hassan: see “buffer zone” and “EMILY’s List.” There’s more, but that’s plenty.


I had a chance to ask Walt Havenstein one question recently: if a repeal of the buffer zone law were to land on his desk, would he sign it? His answer was yes.

There was no time for followup questions in the situation. Would he sign a Massachusetts-style repeal-and-replace, or would he just be happy with straight repeal? A lot would depend on what passed out of the House and Senate first, I imagine. All I could take away from our one Q & A was a sense of relief and the knowledge that he hasn’t been conditioned to put the wishes of abortion providers ahead of the First Amendment.

I’m casting my vote in this race as a defensive one, as I plan to do in the Senate race, because the incumbents need to be retired. Defense feels pretty good when its success means stepping away from a law so awful that even the people who sponsored it and fought to pass it aren’t willing to demand its enforcement. Just get the wretched law off the books.

Gov. Hassan has fans

The Planned Parenthood New Hampshire Action Fund is putting its money and its pink signs behind Governor Maggie Hassan. This just up on Twitter:


As for protecting women’s health, she continues to resist efforts to improve abortion-facility inspection and licensing regulations, and she has done nothing to encourage public health officials to track New Hampshire women’s post-abortion morbidity and mortality. She has yet to explain how losing a contract for “family planning” forces a private entity like PP to deny “cancer screenings” (not to be confused with mammograms, which PP doesn’t do in NH) while leaving its own public policy budget untouched. There are five more weeks until the election, though. The governor has plenty of time to address this. So does her opponent, Walt Havenstein.